Thu, Oct 14 | Virtual Lecture via WebEx

Lecture: No Need to See a Specialist: the Flexibility of Ancient Greek Deities

Contrary to popular belief, the ancient Greeks believed their gods could do it all! This lecture draws on textual sources, inscriptions, and archaeological material that demonstrates just how multi-talented worshippers believed the ancient Greek pantheon was.
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Lecture: No Need to See a Specialist: the Flexibility of Ancient Greek Deities

Time & Location

Oct 14, 7:00 PM
Virtual Lecture via WebEx

About the Event

Join us in a lecture with Dey Mansion staff member Nicole Colosimo. Colosimo will share her training and expertise in Greek Culture with a virtual  lecture entitled: “No Need to See a Specialist: the Flexibility of Ancient Greek Deities"

 

Contrary to popular belief, the ancient Greeks believed their gods could do it all! This lecture draws on textual sources, inscriptions, and archaeological material that demonstrates just how multi-talented worshippers believed the ancient Greek pantheon was. 

Numerous deities and heroes comprised the pantheons of ancient Greek cities and despite the tendency of many scholars to assign them various spheres of influence, these divine beings did not specialize in areas such as marriage, sexuality, war, or healing. This lecture presents evidence from textual sources, inscriptions, and archaeological material that indicates worshippers believed their divine beings were flexible and capable of assisting them with any of their concerns. 

Nicole Colosimo is a staff member for the County of Passaic’s Department of Cultural & Historic Affairs. She serves as the Museum Site Manager for Hamilton House Museum in Clifton. Dr. Colosimo earned a BA in Anthropology and Religious Studies with Classics from Agnes Scott College and a BA in Classical Culture from the University of Georgia. Afterward, she earned an MA and a PhD in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Bryn Mawr College. Her research focuses on the flexibility and limitation inherent in the ancient Greek dedicatory process. She has participated in a number of excavations and archaeological research in America, Greece, Italy, Egypt, and Bulgaria.

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